Thread: New at tagging

Results 1 to 3 of 3
  1. #1 New at tagging 
    Registered Member xisantaix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    4
    Thanks given
    0
    Thanks received
    1
    Rep Power
    0
    Really new to photoshop and I'm starting to learn with tags I'd like to know what people think.

    Reply With Quote  
     

  2. #2  
    Designer

    Kadachi's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2009
    Age
    23
    Posts
    2,534
    Thanks given
    469
    Thanks received
    1,341
    Rep Power
    3789
    For someone who is new at tagging, this is quite well done. Those yellow lines - is that pentool work you did yourself or is it an effect?
    As for improvement, there are a few areas you can work on. First off, you should keep in mind the rules of third when placing a focal on a canvas. It's mainly a practice that is used to effectively capture an image in a photograph, but the principle is the same for tagging, as composition is a key element when creating any piece. I'll let you read more into it [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] instead of defining it, but you'll notice a lot of taggers follow the same guideline in their work.

    Here is an example of a tag that uses the rule of thirds well,


    You'll notice your eyes naturally drag to the character in this tag. As for the rest of your tag, I think you have a good start with the work you've done to the focal, but the background and foreground elements are lacking. I'd recommend experimenting on your own and trying to find a style that best suits you. I personally try to envision what the end result of my tag will be before I begin any serious work on it, and then I aim for said result while still experimenting along the way.

    A few other aspects you should keep in mind when tagging are flow, blending and depth. The flow of your tag is the general movement in the which the eyes of the viewer will move when looking at it. Generally, you'll want to create swift patterning without any major disruptions to achieve excellent flow. Here is an example of a tag with good flow,


    As you can see, the flow of the image moves from the bottom right to the top left in an almost spiral-like pattern (or vice versa). Blending.. well, it defines itself really. Your focal point should be blended into both the foreground and background of your tag so it does not stick out like a sore thumb and the tag instead feels like one complete piece. Blending, however, can be tricky as it is sometimes very easy to over-blend your focal, making it difficult to see entirely. Depth is a concept that is a bit more advanced and is something that I personally believe will improve in your work as you improve yourself. To me, depth is the ability for a tag to have a discerning background, mid-ground and foreground. A tag with great depth usually has effects that pop out which prevents the tag from feeling flat. Here is a good example,


    Just keep in mind that these are very traditional and basic concepts that you should first follow for the sake of general guidance. Ultimately, I would encourage you to experiment as much as you can and to not be afraid of trying different things. I can assure you that the best tags you make will be ones in which you were somewhat out of your comfort zone.

    Keep it up!
    Last edited by Kadachi; 01-31-2019 at 05:56 AM.


    Reply With Quote  
     

  3. Thankful user:


  4. #3  
    Registered Member xisantaix's Avatar
    Join Date
    Dec 2014
    Posts
    4
    Thanks given
    0
    Thanks received
    1
    Rep Power
    0
    Quote Originally Posted by Shadow Lux View Post
    For someone who is new at tagging, this is quite well done. Those yellow lines - is that pentool work you did yourself or is it an effect?
    As for improvement, there are a few areas you can work on. First off, you should keep in mind the rules of third when placing a focal on a canvas. It's mainly a practice that is used to effectively capture an image in a photograph, but the principle is the same for tagging, as composition is a key element when creating any piece. I'll let you read more into it [Only registered and activated users can see links. ] instead of defining it, but you'll notice a lot of taggers follow the same guideline in their work.

    Here is an example of a tag that uses the rule of thirds well,


    You'll notice your eyes naturally drag to the character in this tag. As for the rest of your tag, I think you have a good start with the work you've done to the focal, but the background and foreground elements are lacking. I'd recommend experimenting on your own and trying to find a style that best suits you. I personally try to envision what the end result of my tag will be before I begin the serious work on it, and then I aim for said result while still experimenting along the way.

    A few other aspects you should keep in mind when tagging are flow, blending and depth. The flow of your tag is the general movement in the which the the eyes of the viewer will move when looking at it. Generally you'll want to create swift patterning without any major disruptions to achieve excellent flow. Here is an example of a tag with good flow,


    As you can see, the flow of the image moves from the bottom right to the top left in an almost spiral-like pattern (or vice versa). Blending.. well, it defines itself really. Your focal point should be blended into both the foreground and background of your tag so it does not stick out like a sore thumb and the tag feels like one complete piece. Blending, however, can be tricky as it is sometimes very easy to over-blend your focal, making it difficult to see entirely. Depth is a concept that is a bit more advanced and is something that I personally believe will improve in your work as you improve yourself. To me, depth is the ability for a tag to have a discerning background, mid-ground and foreground. A tag with great depth usually has effects that pop out which prevents the tag from feeling flat. Here is a good example,


    Just keep in mind that these are very traditional and basic concepts that you should first follow for the sake of general guidance. Ultimately, I would encourage you to experiment as much as you can and to not be afraid of trying different things. I can assure that you the best tags you make are ones in which you were somewhat out of your comfort zone.

    Keep it up!



    Fantastic feedback thanks Shadow, I already answered you in a DM but for anyone else wondering all the yellow lines are hand drawn with the pentool and the tiger is pentool filled with an affect put on after.
    Reply With Quote  
     


Thread Information
Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. New at tags :-)
    By Skorch in forum Showcase
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 09-15-2014, 05:51 PM
  2. Making new ::Yell Tags?
    By .Bro in forum Help
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 03-29-2011, 01:24 AM
  3. two new smudge tags
    By Justin in forum Showcase
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 06-20-2009, 01:10 AM
  4. [525] error pls help (im new at this :D)
    By GaMePaPa in forum Help
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 02-23-2009, 05:52 PM
  5. My newest sig(im new at gfx)
    By †ZerohControl† in forum Showcase
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 09-09-2007, 10:07 AM
Posting Permissions
  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •